Page 5 - Senior Times South Central Michigan - January 2017 - 24-01
P. 5

Senior Times - January 2017
Page 5
EXERCISE TIPS FOR PEOPLE WITH INJURIES
& DISABILITIES
The benefits of exercise are not restricted to people who have full mobility.
In fact, if injury, disability, illness, or weight problems have limited your mobility, it’s even more important to experience the mood-boosting effects of exercise.
Exercise can ease depression, relieve stress and anxiety, enhance self-esteem, and improve your whole outlook on life. While there are many challenges that come with having mobility issues, by adopting a creative approach, you can overcome your physical limitations and find enjoyable ways to exercise.
Limited mobility doesn’t mean you
can’t exercise. When you exercise, your body releases endorphins that energize your mood, relieve stress, boost your self-esteem, and trigger an overall sense of well-being.
If you’re a regular exerciser currently sidelined with an injury, you’ve probably noticed how inactivity has caused your
mood and energy levels to sink. This is understandable: exercise has such a powerful effect on mood it can treat mild to moderate depression as effectively as antidepressant medication. However, an injury doesn’t mean your mental and emotional health is doomed to decline. While some injuries respond best to total rest, most simply require you to reevaluate your exercise routine with help from your doctor or physical therapist.
If you have a disability, severe weight problem, chronic breathing condition, diabetes, arthritis, or other ongoing illness you may think that your health problems make it impossible for you to exercise effectively, if at all. Or perhaps you’ve
become frail with age and are worried about falling or injuring yourself if you try to exercise. The truth is, regardless of your age, current physical condition, and whether you’ve exercised in the past or not, there are plenty of ways to overcome your mobility issues and reap the physical, mental, and emotional rewards of exercise.
What types of exercise are possible with limited mobility? It’s important to remember that any type of exercise will offer health benefits. Mobility issues inevitably make some types of exercise easier than others,
but no matter your physical situation, you should aim to incorporate three different types of exercise into your routines:
Cardiovascular exercise can raise
your heart rate and increase your endurance. These can include walking, running, cycling, dancing, tennis, swimming, water aerobics, or “aquajogging”. Many people with mobility issues find exercising in water especially beneficial as it supports the body and reduces the risk of muscle or joint discomfort. Even if you’re confined to
a chair or wheelchair, it’s still possible
to perform cardiovascular exercise.
Strength training exercises involve using weights or other resistance to build muscle and bone mass, improve balance, and prevent falls. If you have limited mobility in your legs, your focus will be
on upper body strength training. Similarly, if you have a shoulder injury, for example, your focus will be more on strength training your legs and abs.
Flexibility exercises help enhance
your range of motion, prevent injury, and reduce pain and stiffness. These may include stretching exercises and yoga. Even if
you have limited mobility in your legs,
for example, you may still benefit from
stretches and flexibility exercises to prevent or delay further muscle atrophy.
To exercise successfully with limited mobility, illness, or weight problems, start by getting medical clearance.
Talk to your doctor, physical therapist,
or other health care provider about activities suitable for your medical condition or mobility issue. They can help you find
a suitable exercise routine. Ask:
• How much exercise can I do each day and each week?
• What type of exercise should I do? • What exercises or activities should
I avoid?
• Should I take medication at a certain
time around my exercise routine?
As well as the physical challenges you face,
you may also experience mental or emotional barriers to exercising. It’s common for people to feel self-conscious about their weight, disability, illness, or injury, and want to avoid working out in public places. Some older people find that they’re fearful about falling or otherwise injuring themselves.
Don’t focus on your mobility or health issue. Instead of worrying about the activities you can’t enjoy, concentrate on finding activities that you can.
The more physical challenges you face,
the more creative you’ll need to be to find an exercise routine that works for you. If you used to enjoy jogging or cycling, for example, but injury, disability, or illness means they’re no longer options, be prepared to try new exercises. With some experimenting, it’s very possible that you’ll find something you enjoy just as much.
Be proud when you make the effort to exercise, even if it’s not very successful at first. It will get easier the more you practice.
CITY
Nashville Delton
Union City
Battle Creek Albion Marshall Battle Creek Homer
Michigan Center Jackson Jackson
LOCATION
Main St. Banqets
Faith United Methodist
FACILITATOR
Jenny Burlison Elayne Nottingham
PHONE DAYS
(269) 852-9182 M-F (269) 623-5400 M,W,T
TIME
10:30am-1pm 10:30am-1pm
SENIOR DINING CENTERS
BARRY COUNTY
Hastings
COA Building
Mary Cook
(269) 948-4856
M-F
10am-2pm
Woodland
Eagles Club
Joyce Dennie
(269) 367-4041
M,W,F
10:30am-1pm
Meals provided by Barry County Commission on Aging. A program sponsored by Barry County United Way.
Union City Fire Station Rusty Hampton (517) 741-7212 M,T,TH,F 10:30am-12pm
Lunch served at 12pm
BRANCH COUNTY
Coldwater
Branch County CAA Office
Tamara Wittbrodt
(517) 278-8249
M-F
9am-1pm
Lunch Served at 12pm
Meals provided by Community Action Food and Nutritional Services. Funding sources AAA 3C, Branch County United Way, USDA and private donations.
CALHOUN COUNTY
Albion
Albion Senior Dining Center
Cynthia Rose
(866) 200-8877 ext 350
M,T,W,F
10:30am-1pm
Lunch served at 12pm
Bedford Manor Dining Center Clarence Dining Center Marshall House Dining Center Westbrook Place Dining Center Homer Presbyterian Church
Burdell Wells
Sharon Rice
Bablynn Squires Michelle Dove
Senior Health Partners
(866) 200-8877 ext 350 (866) 200-8877 ext 350 (866) 200-8877 ext 350 (866) 200-8877 ext 350 (866) 200-8877 ext 350
M,W,F 10:30am-1pm M,T,W 10:30am-1pm M,W,F 10:30am-1pm M,W,F 10:30am-1pm T 10:30am
Lunch served at 11:30am Lunch served at 11:45am Lunch served at 12pm Lunch served at 11:30am Whole Person Wellness too
Lunch served at 12pm
Lunch served at 12pm
Lunch served at 12pm
Battle Creek
Cherryhill Manor Senior Center
Constance Siegel
(866) 200-8877 ext 350
M,W,F
10:30am-1pm
Lunch served at 11:30am
Battle Creek
Lakeview 900 Dining Center
Karl Hoard
(866) 200-8877 ext 350
M,W,F
10:30am-1pm
Lunch served at 11:30am
Battle Creek
Springview Towers Dining Center
Caroline Oberlin
(866) 200-8877 ext 350
M,W,F
10:30am-1pm
Lunch served at 11:30am
Battle Creek
Northside Senior Dining Center
Deboraha Sallee
(866) 200-8877 ext 350
T,W,Th
10:30am-1pm
Lunch served at 11:30am
Tekonsha
Tekonsha Community Hall
Senior Health Partners
(866) 200-8877 ext 350
T
10am
Whole Person Wellness too
Meals provided by Senior Services. Funding by Calhoun County Senior Services, AAA 3B, USDA and private donations.
JACKSON COUNTY
Jackson
Crouch Senior Center
Michelle Rose
(517) 788-4364
M,T,W,Th,F
8am-4pm
Lunch served at 12pm
St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church
Park Forest
Word of Light
Nikki Soli
Lynn Walker
Nancy Behling
(517) 764-2950
(517) 787-9750
(517) 782-7755
M,W,F 10am-2pm
M,T,W,Th,F 10am-1pm
M,T,W,Th,F 10am-1:30pm
Norvell
Norvell/Township Hall
Gail Jamieson
(517) 536-4370
M,W,F
10am-1pm
Lunch served at 12pm
Spring Arbor
Spring Arbor Senior Center
Bev Greene
(517) 750-1010
M,T,W,Th,F
8:30am-2:30pm
Lunch served at 12pm
To have your senior dining center added, Call Sherii at (269) 979-1412 ext. 302 or Email: ssherban@wwthayne.com


































































































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