Page 23 - Senior Times South Central Michigan - September 2017 - 24-09
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sunscreen to the top of your head,
or wear a hat.
• No sunscreen completely blocks UV
radiation, and other protections are needed, such as protective clothing, sunglasses, and staying in the shade.
• No sunscreen is waterproof.
An average-size adult or child needs at least one ounce of sunscreen, about the amount to fill a shot glass, to evenly cover the body.
Although UVB rays are the primary cause of sunburn, both UVA and UVB rays contribute to skin cancer. All sunscreens protect against the sun’s UVB rays, but only those that are broad spectrum also protect against UVA rays.
Scientific studies have determined that broad spectrum sunscreens with an SPF
of at least 15 can help reduce the risk of sun-induced skin cancer and premature skin aging when used with other sun protective measures, as directed. If you have lighter skin, you may want to use a sunscreen
with an SPF higher than 15.
Under the FDA’s final regulations:
• Products that pass a broad spectrum
test can be labeled “broad spectrum.”
• Sunscreens that are not broad spectrum or that lack an SPF of at least 15 must
carry a warning: “Skin Cancer/Skin Aging Alert: Spending time in the sun
increases your risk of skin cancer and early skin aging. This product has been shown only to help prevent sunburn, not skin cancer or early skin aging.”
• Water resistance claims, for 40 or 80 minutes, tell how much time you can expect to get the labeled SPF-level of protection while swimming or sweating.
• Manufacturers may no longer make claims that their sunscreens are “waterproof” or “sweat proof.”
• Products may no longer be identified as “sunblocks” or claim instant protection or protection for more than two hours without reapplying.
Remember, people of all skin colors are potentially at risk for sunburn and other harmful effects of UV radiation, so always protect yourself. Be especially careful if you have:
• Pale skin
• Blond, red, or light brown hair • Been treated for skin cancer
• A family member who has had
skin cancer
Certain sunglasses can help protect your
eyes. When using sunglasses:
as having more UV protection. The darkness of the lens does not indicate its ability to shield your eyes from UV rays. Many sunglasses with light-colored tints, such as green, amber, red, and gray can offer the same UV protection as very dark lenses.
• Consider large, wraparound-style
frames, which may provide more efficient UV protection because they cover the entire eye-socket.
Sunlight reflecting off sand, water, or even snow, further increases exposure to UV radiation and increases your risk of developing eye problems.
Sunglasses are especially important when doing activities around or on water because much of the UV comes from light reflected off the water’s surface.
• Understand that pricier sunglasses don’t ensure greater UV protection.
• Even if you wear contact lenses, wear sunglasses that offer UV protection.
• Know that sunglasses are the most effective when worn with a wide-brim hat and sunscreen.
Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Consumer Updates page is the source for this article with the full article and the latest up- dates on FDA regulated products available at http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/default.htm.
• •
Choose sunglasses labeled with a UVA/UVB rating of 100% to get the most UV protection.
Do not mistake dark-tinted sunglasses
Senior Times - September 2017
Page 23
NUMBER OF UNITS INDEPENDENT LIVING ASSISTED LIVING SKILLED NURSING ALZHEIMER / DEMENTIA RESPITE CARE
ADULT DAYCARE PETS
RESIDENT PARKING TRANSPORTATION PRIVATE PAY NURSE ON DUTY REHAB
LONG TERM STAY SHORT TERM STAY MEDICATION DELIVERY LAUNDRY HOUSEKEEPING ACTIVITIES
100% MEALS
24 HOUR STAFFING LICENSED FACILITY SPECIFIC DIET PLANS
SENIOR HOUSING
GUIDE
MAPLE GROVE APARTMENTS
•••••
•• ••••••••••••••
15 1041 Maple St, Albion, MI Balinda Cavazos, 517-629-2026
72
114
55
104
50
100
77
30
40
175
45
69
40
MAPLE LAWN MEDICAL CARE FACILITY
16 50 Sanderson Lane, Coldwater, MI 49036 Sue Failing, 517-279-9587
MAPLEWOOD OF MARSHALL
• ••• •••
• •
••
• •
••••••••••••• • ••••••••••••••• •••• ••✚•••••
• • • • • • ✚ • • •  • •• •••••••••••• ••• •••••••••••
17 200 Westbrook Court, Marshall, MI Karin Gallagher, 269-781-4997
MEDILODGE OF MARSHALL
18 879 E. Michigan Avenue, Marshall, MI Cassandra Lucas, 269-781-4251
NORTHPOINTE WOODS ASSISTED LIVING
19 700 North Avenue, Battle Creek, MI Melissa Ferguson, 269-964-7625
NORTHPOINTEWOODSINDEPENDENTLIVING
•
• ••••••
••••••
• ••••• •• ••••••••••
20 700 North Avenue, Battle Creek, MI Melissa Ferguson, 269-964-7625
•
OAKS AT NORTHPOINTE WOODS
21 706 North Avenue, Battle Creek, MI 269-964-4655
PENNFIELD PREMIER LIVING
22 632 North Avenue, Battle Creek, MI 49017 Renee Kelly, 269-964-8292
REFLECTIONS MEMORY CARE
• ••• ••••••••••••••
23 14316 Helmer Road South, Battle Creek, MI Alyssa Jones, 269-969-2500
SPRINGVIEWTOWER
• • •


24 231 Springview Drive, Battle Creek, MI 49037 Paula Hopson, 269-968-9105
VILLAGE OF MILL CREEK
25 300 Carl Ave, Battle Creek, MI 49037 Jennifer Bouchard, 269-962-0605
WESTBROOK PLACE APARTMENTS
26 183 West Street, Battle Creek, MI 49037 David Ward, 269-753-0062
WOODLAWN MEADOWS RETIREMENT VILLAGE
27 1821 N East Street, Hastings, MI Lauren Bauer, 269-948-4921
= CITY ✚ = MED MANAGEMENT
 = EMERGENCY CALL   Like to be added? Email Christyn Sherban at csherban@wwthayne.com.


































































































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